Domaine Dujac Puligny Montrachet 1er Cru Les Folatières 2015

Les Folatières is one of the great 1er Cru vineyards of Puligny. The pedigree shines through in Dujac's interpretation!

“The 2015 Puligny-Montrachet Les Folatières is a rich, expressive wine. There is discernible power to the peach, orange peel and mint notes. Layered and voluptuous, with considerable intensity, the 2015 is impressive.” Stephen Tanzer

Dujac’s wines are as rare as hen’s teeth!

$215.00

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Why is this Wine so Yummy?

About Dujac

Domaine Dujac is the adventure of an American in France. A young Domaine established through the purchase of an old, perhaps run down Domaine. In the hands of Jacques the winery has been rebuilt, the vineyards rehabilitated and expanded to include holdings in some the greatest Grand and 1er Cru’s in the Côtes. Now with son Jeremy and his wife Dianna running the show, the wines which under Jacques commenced a rise into the stratosphere have continued to rocket upward in both quality and unfortunately for the drinker, price.

A 2015 Clos de la Roche I had in late 2018 was wine of the session which included Grand Cru’s from DRC, Faiveley, Dugat-Py and Bruno Clair. The harmony, texture, expression, complexity and layering made for an intoxicating drink. Whilst all bar the DRC were 2015 and a little too young. It was clear just how together and delicious the wines of Dujac are.

Puligny-Montrachet

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The whites of Puligny tend to be more linear, and, structure with lovely mineral acid.

4 Grand Cru’s: Montrachet & Bârtard-Montrachet, both shared with Chassagne. Bienvenue-Bâtard-Montrachet and Chevalier-Montrachet, both residing fully in Puligny.

There are 19 Premier Cru’s in Puligny with about 1.2% producing red wine. The best known Premier Cru’s are Les Pucelles and Champ Gain, both resting adjacent to the Grand Cru’s followed by Les Folatières.


Exploring the Geology & Geography of the Villages

In this video the villages of Puligny-Montrachet, Saint-Aubin and Chassagne-Montrachet are explored. Towards the end, you’ll note the discussion of the soils in the south part of Chassagne-Montrachet being the same as parts of the Côte de Nuits.

Exploring Puligny-Montrachet, Chassagne-Montrachet and Meursault with Olivier Leflaive. Early Olivier notes the differences in colour when the wines are young, his Chassagne’s a little yellow, Puligny’s with a green tinge and Mersault golden. At the end of the video there is a fascinating tasting of Olivier Leflaives village whites from Chassagne, Meursault, and, Puligny exploring the differences between the three.

The summary reflects my own generalisation for the white wines of these villages beautifully. Whites from Chassagne tend to be more opulent and have great perceived richness, Meursault can be quite bold and full, Puligny typically the more linear, structured with greater perceived mineral acidity.

As is always the case, different sites and vintages impact these generalisations, a cooler vintage or one with lot’s of millerandage, can result in higher acids defining Chassagne as an example more than in a warmer year. In hot years there can be less differentiation between the villages.

You can learn more about these three regions in the Wine Bites Mag Article “Getting Your Head Around Burgundy Part 4 – The White(ish) Villages of Chassagne-Montrachet, Pugliny-Montrachet, Saint-Aubin”

91-93 Points

The 2015 Puligny-Montrachet Les Folatières is a rich, expressive wine. There is discernible power to the peach, orange peel and mint notes. Layered and voluptuous, with considerable intensity, the 2015 is impressive.

Stephen Tanzer

Where in the world does the magic happen?

Domaine Dujac, Rue de la Bussière, Morey-Saint-Denis, France

Burgundy

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Côte du Beaune

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Puligny-Montrachet

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