Dolcetto’s, pronounced dole-CHET-toe, translates to ‘Little Sweet’.

Hit the restaurants in Alba at lunchtime and you’ll see plenty of Dolcetto on the table.

The great estates of Barolo, naturally make great Dolcetto.

Where is it grown?

It’s widely planted throughout the Langhe, the broader region within which Barbaresco and Barolo rest.

It is also grown in Liguria under the name Ormeasco, and, in the Oltrepò Pavese, where it is confusingly named, Nebbiolo or Nibièu. The only DOCG (highest Italian classification) is Dolcetto di Dogliani. The wines of Alba, home to Barolo, being classified DOC, but, perhaps the finest of all of the Barberas.

Lower in acid, ripening weeks before Barbera and Nebbiolo, allows it to be planted in higher, and, cooler sites. Getting the tannin ripe is essential.

What does it taste like?

The wines tend to have deep dark colour, opulent fruit and age well over around five years.

Dolcetto tends to have darker, black fruit characters, with an earthiness, and, fruit derived (not oak derived) woody character. Rich in mid-palate fruit, they often have an edge of rustic, fun, tannin. Many producers make Dolcetto that is a little raw, not developed enough prior to bottling to present as a complete wine.

The best like Voerzio, Cavalotto and Bartolo Mascarello make wines that have undergone a full élévage and have an extra layer of poise. This time, tames the fruit, giving the wine enough oxygen to take the raw edge off it, balancing it with a decent layer of softer tannin.

Check out all the articles in the Wine Bites Mag exploring Dolcetto.

Looking for a Dolcetto? Check these out. If there’s something else you want call us on 1300 811 066 or Request a Wine Here. We have access to an incredible array of tasty Dolcetto!

Check out all the Dolcetto Here!

Check out all the Dolcetto Here!

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